Attention: You are viewing an archive!

  • Forms will not work. Some links may not work or may be deprecated.
  • Punchscan is now part of Scantegrity.

Punchscan for Voters with Disabilities

Unable to Mark, but Able to See and Hear Through the use of an aide to mark the ballot who does not get any information on the vote, these voters can enjoy the same degree of functionality enjoyed by other voters.

A voter makes the layer choice (which ballot layer she would take back with her) before entering the booth, and enters it with only one layer and audio versions of both layers. On hearing the audio layers, and determining which disc is to be marked, the voter requests the aide to mark it. Note that the aide has only one layer and so does not know what vote is being cast, only which disc is to be marked. The voter takes the receipt home with her, and may check that it is online.

Unable to Hear, but Able to See and Mark The basic Punchscan model does not require the ability to hear. It is only required as a substitute to the ability to see or mark.

Unable to See or Mark, but Able to Hear: Through the use of audio versions of the ballot layers, and an aide to mark the ballot who does not get any information on the vote, these voters can enjoy the same degree of functionality enjoyed by other voters.

A voter makes the layer choice (which ballot layer she would take back with her) before entering the booth, and enters it with only one layer and audio versions of both layers. On hearing the audio layers, and determining which disc is to be marked, the voter requests the aide to mark it. Note that the aide has only one layer and so does not know what vote is being cast, only which disc is to be marked. Further, the voter may tape her requests, and take this tape (digitally signed by a computer) home with the paper receipt. As with blind voters who can mark, she may check that her paper receipt is online. This checks that the voting system has counted her vote as cast by the aide. Further, she may also check that the tape of her instructions to the aide matches the audio version of the paper receipt online. This checks that the aide cast the vote as instructed by her.

Unable to See, but Able to Hear and to Mark: Through the use of audio versions of the ballot layers, these voters can enjoy the same degree of functionality enjoyed by other voters. This functionality is also useful to those voters who are unable to read.

Voters are provided audio versions (in the form of tapes or computerized clips) of both layers of their Punchscan ballot. The audio versions are played in earphones and heard only by the voter. Each layer plays in a different ear and together they indicate to the voter which disc to mark for her choice of candidate. Through the use of tactile aids, the voter marks the disc. Like other voters, this voter takes one of the layers home. The website holds audio versions of all receipts. Using recognition software, the voter obtains the serial number of her receipt. Further, using software similar to that used by Punchscan to create the audio versions of the cast paper ballots, she obtains an audio version of her receipt which she matches with the version online (the voter can get software she trusts for this). Each ballot constructed for the election has audio versions associated with it, and all posted receipts have associated audio versions. When commitments are checked, they are checked for both audio and paper versions, and it is also checked that audio versions match paper versions.